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LoveQuiltsUK - Harry B's quilt

Harry B's quilt   (Quilt Coming Soon)

Born:October 2008
Illness: Epilepsy

Theme: Space and Star Wars


Quilt will open soon, keep checking back!
Photo of Harry B

Theme details

Space and Star Wars - Please see our Pattern listing for legal Star Wars patterns. (Note: Brother of Grace B)



Child Interests

Harry is mad on Star Wars he loves Darth Vader in particular , he is fascinated by the ships and models and has a small collection of vintage ships his favourite is the at-at . His favourite colours are blue, green, red, orange, and yellow. He is very sporty and has just joined the school football team, he enjoys reading ,his favourites are the wimpy kid books and he also enjoys the stories by David walliams.


Biography

Harry was born one of a set of twins in October 2008; the twins were delivered by Caesarian at 35 weeks because Harry had stopped growing in the womb, at birth he was just 4lbs 7oz unable to control and maintain his temperature he was put in a special cot underneath heat lamps and carefully monitored. Meanwhile his twin sister Grace was rushed by critical care ambulance to Birmingham Children’s hospital. She was extremely poorly as she had been born with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus. Harry was released from hospital with his mum at 3days old. Over the next few weeks he struggled to gain weight as he wasn’t tolerating his feeds and would projectile vomit after each feed. At 6 weeks old Harry stopped breathing and was given life saving cpr by his dad before being blue lighted to our local hospital and eventually transferred to Leicester Royal infirmary for specialist treatment, it was thought the reason he stopped breathing was severe bronchiolitis . Harry recovered from this episode and slowly started to gain weight. When Harry was around 2 he started to have seizures these coincided with him being unwel with coughs and colds and so the drs put it down to febrile convulsions and that he would grow out of them. He continued to have seizures intermittently until March 2015 he had a massive seizure and lost consciousness again he needed emergency first aid and was rushed to hospital. The local hospital saw Harry very several months with his seizures but refused to give him a diagnosis of epilepsy as they still thought he was having febril convulsions even though he was by this time 7 almost 8 and medical opinion is that febrile convulsions stop after age 6. We referred him to Birmingham Children’s hospital for a second opinion and finally in August 2017 he was diagnosed with epilepsy. Harry has accepted his diagnosis very well and is learning to manage his activities to keep himself safe, although recently he has struggled when it happens at school he felt the other kids no longer saw him as Harry but in his words as the ‘epileptic kid’






















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